We regularly host renowned visitors from the area of HCI who talk about their work during lunchtime. Hence, we invite the audience to bring their own lunch and engage with our speakers more informally.

Our next speakers are:

Title
Instant Interaction
Speaker
Florian Echtler (Bauhaus Universität Weimar, Germany)
Date and Time
Monday, September 25, 2017; 13:00h
Place
Library, Argentinierstraße 8, 2nd Floor, 1040 Wien
Abstract
Although Mark Weiser's original vision of "ubiquitous computing" has all but arrived due to the wide availability of smartphones, tablets and interactive screens, the envisioned ease of use is still mostly lacking. This is particularly apparent when we consider interaction and collaboration between multiple persons and their personal mobile devices. These issues can be partly mitigated by relying on cloud services for data exchange, but this approach opens up multiple other issues regarding data safety and privacy.
In this talk, I will present the concept of "instant interaction", which aims to enable ad-hoc interaction between multiple persons, their individual mobile devices, and fixed infrastructure, without requiring any prior exchange of account data or PINs. The only prerequisite for immediate interaction is physical proximity. Examples from my current research will illustrate this concept.
Short Bio
Florian Echtler is junior professor for mobile media at Bauhaus-Universität Weimar. His research interests focus on interaction and collaboration using peer-to-peer communication technologies available in today's mobile devices. Additional topics covered by his research include computer vision for HCI applications, sensor technology and gesture recognition.

Title
LUDI Play for All - Workshop Experiences
Speaker
Laura Scheepmaker (TU Wien)
Date and Time
Tuesday, October 3, 2017; 13:00h
Place
Library, Argentinierstraße 8, 2nd Floor, 1040 Wien
Abstract
LUDI is a network and COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) action that aims to create a field of research and intervention on play for children with disabilities. The main objective is to spread awareness on the importance of giving children with disabilities the opportunity to play, while ensuring equity in their exercise of the right to play and by putting play at the centre of the multidisciplinary research and intervention regarding children with disabilities.
To share the collected knowledge and spread the word of play for children with disabilities a LUDI training school was hold in the Netherlands from April 18th to 21st, 2017. During this lunch talk I want to share my LUDI experiences with you and tell you more about the following subjects:
- The approach 'Play for the sake of play'
- A holistic approach of play from a multidisciplinary point of view
- Awareness of inclusive play
- Sharing information about usability and accessibility related to toys, instruments and technologies
Short Bio
Laura Scheepmaker is a former industrial design student of the University of Twente and the new PhD candidate of the team Social Play Technologies. She has worked as a social worker with children with disabilities and aims to develop smart products that support inclusion of children with ASD.


Title
Body-Centric Playful Interactions
Speaker
Florian 'Floyd' Müller (RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia)
Date and Time
Friday, October 6th, 2017; 13:00h
Place
Library, Argentinierstraße 8, 2nd Floor, 1040 Wien
Abstract
Coming soon.
Short Bio
Coming soon.


Title
Playing at Planning: Developing Games to Support Disaster Responders
Speaker
Zachary O. Dugas Toups (New Mexico State University, USA)
Date and Time
Thursday, October 19th, 2017; 13:00h
Place
Library, Argentinierstraße 8, 2nd Floor, 1040 Wien
Abstract
We draw on years of ethnographic investigation into the disaster response practices of fire emergency response, urban search and rescue, and incident command to inform the design of games. Our objective is to support training disaster responders, yet our findings apply to general game design. We identify critical components of disaster response practice, from which we develop game design patterns: emergent objectives, developing intelligence, and collaborative planning. We expect that, in implementing these patterns, designers can engage players in disaster-response-style planning activities. To support the design patterns, we survey exemplar games, through case studies. We contribute a set of game design patterns that support designers in building games that engage players in planning activities.
Short Bio
Zachary O. Toups is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at New Mexico State University, having started in August 2013, where his research areas include intersections of collaboration support, game design, wearable computers, and disaster response. His current projects explore how game players gather and share information in-game; how games can teach disaster planning activities; how wearables can support human-human and human-drone collaboration; and how games can be used to design and test wearable computer interfaces. He asserts that digital game play is the human-computer interface in its purest form; people play games in order to experience interfaces.
In his present position, Prof. Toups has brought in over 1 million USD in research funding from the US National Science Foundation and Army Research Lab, including an NSF CAREER award. He directs the Play and Interactive Experiences for Learning (PIxL) Lab, which supports five Ph.D. students and a number of M.S. students. He is the Co-Chair for the ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Human-Computer Interaction and Play (CHI PLAY) for 2016 and 2017, and has served in a number of roles for CHI PLAY, the ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, and other conferences. Prof. Toups received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Texas A&M University in 2010 and his B.A. of Computer Science from Southwestern University in 2003. In between his Ph.D. and appointment at NMSU, he researched information technology to support disaster responders at the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service with the Texas Task Force 1 elite urban search and rescue group.